WA How to Score

How to Score

There are a variety of target faces, styles and sizes; outdoor target archery uses coloured targets which are either 122cm or 80cm in diameter while indoor target archery uses three-spot target faces. The target face is attached to the target butts usually with the centre 130cm above the ground. For outdoor archery the target butt is also angled back about 10 to 15 degrees off vertical.

Outdoor target faces are divided into 5 colours; Gold, Red, Blue, Black and White. Each colour is divided in half by a thin line to give ten scoring zones. The scoring values for each colour from the centre out are – 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, and 1.

The topics addressed below are as follows:

The Zones
The Scorecard
The Scoring Area
Made a Mistake?
Signatures
Final Details

1. The Zones

In fact, there are eleven scoring zones; with the 10 ring being divided into 2 zones, the inner zone being called the X ring. The X ring still scores 10 points, but any arrow scored in this area is indicated on the scorecard using an X. The X’s are later added and used as tie-breakers in all competitions except for Match Play.

It should be noted that the X Ring is used in all competitions except for Indoor. The indoor three-spot target is also limited to the inner blue zone.

For all events if you have a miss, this is indicated on the scorecard with an M. Outdoor rounds consist of a number of ends at either the same or different distances, with either 6 or 3 arrows shot in an end. Indoor rounds consist of 20-ends with three arrows shot in an end. A break is usually allowed after the first 30 arrows. For outdoor rounds there are a specific number of ends shot for each distance.

There can be up to 4 distances shot for a round. A round may also see different target face sizes used at different distances. To score, the archer calls out the value of their arrows in descending order of score for that end. They should be called in two groups of three arrows, such as X, 10, 9, (pause) 8, 8, 6. These scores are then written by the scorer onto the scorecard in the area provided. The score total for that end is then added up (i.e. 51) and written in the area provided. Usually a running progressive total is being used so the end score is then added to the progressive score. This process is continued until all arrows for the archers on the target are scored. The arrows can then be removed from the target butt.

Prior to all arrows being scored, the target face and arrows must not be touched or moved in any way. Under no circumstances should another archer’s arrows be withdrawn without their prior consent.

During tournaments, scoring is usually done by “Double Scoring”, this is where two score cards are used and two archers on the target score all the arrows. The two scorers should compare the end total for each archer and resolve any discrepancies before any arrows are removed from the target butt. If arrows have been removed from the target butt and an error is found it cannot be corrected. The lowest arrow value will stand. At the completion of the competition the archer must sign the scorecard to confirm the value of the arrows.

When double scoring the archer should check to confirm that both of the scorecards match; if they don’t the lower score will be used. You would need to sign your scorecard, and witness your fellow archers scorecard.

2. The Scorecard

Scorecards are divided into a number of areas that must be completed to ensure the scorecards are correct before being submitted. When you receive your scorecard, your target designation will be entered, along with your name. Check to see your name is spelt correctly. All you need to do is to enter the distance you are shooting. In major tournaments this information may be already entered.

3. The Scoring Area

This area is used to record the values of the arrows as well as to add up the end score and progressive score. To score the archer calls out the value of the arrows in descending order of score for that end. They should be called in two groups of three arrows, such as X, 10, 9, (pause) 8, 8, 6. These scores are then written by the scorer onto the scorecard in the area provided.

The score total for that end (6 or 3 Arrow Score) is then added up (i.e. 51 written in the area provided. Usually a running progressive total is used, after the second end the 1st and 2nd end scores are added to give a progressive score, after each subsequent end the end score is added to the progressive score. At the end of the distance usually the 5th or 6th end (depending upon the round being shot) the score for the distance is then placed into the Distance Total area. With the first distance this is the same as the Progressive Score but subsequent distances have a separate area. This allows the score for that end to be recorded.

Organisers and recorders may wish to record end scores separately as a final check for totals. When shooting in major tournaments, such as the SA Nationals, there may be two different types of scorecards used on each target. The first is the complete scorecard, one for each archer, which allows for the recording of all arrows shot that day. This scorecard must be completed as detailed above. The second may be a distance or end scorecard. This usually contains provision for recording the scores for the 3 archers allocated to the target and could be collected either after each end (if it’s an end scoresheet) or after each distance.

Principally the same scorecard but listing the 3 archers allocated to the target on the one sheet and designed for the scores of only one end or distance. There will be a separate sheet for each end or distance. In major events the organisers should publish results after each distance, this is achieved by using these scorecards. After each distance the completed and signed scorecards should be submitted to allow scores to be entered into the results system. This allows a double checking of the final scores with the full scorecard. For all scorecards, you also need to list the number of X’s and 10’s shot during the distance.

4. Made a Mistake?

If there is an error in writing down arrow values, these can be changed by mutual consent of all the archers on the butt by crossing out the score, writing the correct score and all archer signing the score sheet. Make sure the “old” score is still visible. If there is a discrepancy, call the judge. If arrows have been removed from the target butt and an error is found it can not be corrected. The lowest arrow value will stand.

5. Signatures

All scorecards must be signed by the archer and a scorer prior to being submitted. The archer signs to confirm that they agree with the value of the arrows. The scorecard is then witnessed by another archer usually the scorer. If the archer and the scorer is the same person then another archer on the target should sign the scorecard as the witness. If you wish to claim a record the scorecard must be signed by a third person who must be a tournament official preferably the DOS.

6. Final Details

Prior to submitting the scorecard, ensure the final details are completed. Make sure you have completed the competitor details such as gender, division and equipment division. Any award claims you wish to make, indicate in this section, but remember, by indicating in the boxes you have ordered these awards and have agreed to purchase these awards. The last area you must complete is the total number of X’s and 10’s as well as the final score for the round. Write clearly and in block letters.

The scorecard is the most important document in archery and should be given as much attention as your equipment. The South African National Archery Association (SANAA) makes available a number of awards that can be earned. In all cases, the original score sheet that is witnessed by a SANAA accredited judge must be presented when a claim is made.

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